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Offline BLUEVOODU

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The Linux Topic
« on: October 31, 2018, 05:12:45 PM »
As part of the What Current OS Are you Running thread, we started mentioning Linux.

As part of my current studies, I'm going through Linux Admin Training.  I've worked in many different environments - IBM i OS, Windows (tons of different environments), IBM AIX, and now I'm trekking into Amazon Web Services / Linux. 

At this point, I installed and started playing around with UBUNTU and OpenSUSE.  Hyper-V is available in Windows 10 Pro... that is now setup on my laptop and I've created virtual machines.  Through some of my other training... I will be working with CENTOS and Fedora.

What do you work with and Game with LINUX wise?  What troubles have you encountered and what did you do to solve them? 
Any input @trkorecky @retro junkie @Polygon @medataoh ?

Post it up!

On another note, I am kick starting a tech site soon.  This is going to be to document many of the new Amazon Web Services Cloud studies / what I learned...etc.  This site will also be to document a large range of topics from easy to level III work across many systems.  The plan is to make it so that I can search my site if I need to recall that information, but it's also there to allow others to search and view.  I'm creating the site in Drupal - I spent the last 4 months learning Drupal and may add some of that knowledge as well lol.  I'll create more on this topic later.  IF anyone would like to help write some of these documents, I will be game.  There will be a standards and requirements for writing the documentation.  But I welcome anyone who wants to do this to put their notes out there and also use the repository of knowledge.  There won't be much or any of a forum... until Drupal has a better system or I can do an SMF style bridge or anything but Drupal's forum.



Offline retro junkie

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Re: The Linux Topic
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2018, 07:24:59 PM »
Good idea.
Here are just some of the things that come to mind.

Compatibility is a big issue that I have found over the years. There doesn't seem to be any up-to-date lists floating around. Sometimes I have found myself digging through forum's old topics just to answer a question. Or maybe I have not been able to locate a good list in my searches. And when it comes to compatibility, we are also talking about Distro orientation too, not just if it is compatible to Linux. And the item may be compatible with all linux Distros, it is just you need to tinker to find out why the Distro did not pick it up. Sometimes I just do not feel like fiddling and tinkering, so I find a Distro that works for me.

Wacom tablets seem to have a good compatibility rating. I have one on my desktop. I like drawing, so I use paint programs, I like piddling and dealing with graphic stuff. I have Photoshop CS3 loaded up with WINE. And of course GIMP. And I do have Krita and Fire Alpaca on my desktop as well. I have Blender loaded up but I do not have time to mess with it. Maybe when I retire.

I use the office program, Libre, a lot.

Printers are a big issue I have yet to resolve. HP seems to be the friendliest to linux. I usually end up with an old outdated printer. They are the easiest to find that linux has the drivers for. As Canon scanners are friendly also. The all-in-one printers are difficult to deal with when it comes to linux. Linux cannot find the scanner, or that has been my experience.

I don't game on my computer.

When picking a Distro it is either hit or miss trying to sort through the clutter. You can have a fully compatible computer, whether it be desktop or laptop. But when it comes to selecting a Distro, you end up trying and trying until you find one that will work with all of your hardware. The disappointment comes in when it isn't the one you wanted.

I also surf the net. Because of this, at some point I, or a user, will need to upgrade to a newer Distro. A Linux rolling release distribution is the best route to go. You will have a long term support with updates, usually five years, using that same install. Point release Distros, you need to do a full install to get the newer release of updates, usually every six months. If you have brought to life older hardware, as I like to do, at some point you will no longer be able to upgrade to a newer Distro release. Why? Because at some point a newer Distro release may have needs for a bigger faster processor, graphics card, require more power, more ram, etc. You can use older hardware to run linux just fine on an older distribution. But going on the net there might be some sites, like this one for example, in which an older browser cannot access. (Going to a lite weight Linux Distros can resolve this issue.)
« Last Edit: October 31, 2018, 08:30:46 PM by retro junkie »
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Online CreepinDeth

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Re: The Linux Topic
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2018, 07:24:50 PM »
When picking a Distro it is either hit or miss trying to sort through the clutter. You can have a fully compatible computer, whether it be desktop or laptop. But when it comes to selecting a Distro, you end up trying and trying until you find one that will work with all of your hardware. The disappointment comes in when it isn't the one you wanted.

This is where I would say Ubuntu excels at. I have tons of hardware, both old and new, and so far I have not encountered any issues. I also hear good things about Fedora but I haven't tried it.

Quote
I also surf the net. Because of this, at some point I, or a user, will need to upgrade to a newer Distro. A Linux rolling release distribution is the best route to go. You will have a long term support with updates, usually five years, using that same install. Point release Distros, you need to do a full install to get the newer release of updates, usually every six months. If you have brought to life older hardware, as I like to do, at some point you will no longer be able to upgrade to a newer Distro release. Why? Because at some point a newer Distro release may have needs for a bigger faster processor, graphics card, require more power, more ram, etc. You can use older hardware to run linux just fine on an older distribution. But going on the net there might be some sites, like this one for example, in which an older browser cannot access. (Going to a lite weight Linux Distros can resolve this issue.)

Yeah, now that the web and cloud are dominating the computing space, you need a machine that can run all of that code properly. It's not the distros' fault, but the software creators who use the latest code to run their programs.

Honestly, I feel we need to move away from 32-bit. Once that gets completely deprecated, older machines shouldn't be hit as hard and should be able to use the latest distro keeping them running longer. I believe Ubuntu is already doing this and MacOS is also in the process. iOS is completely 64-bit now if I'm not mistaken. Don't know if Windows will be able to do it but they should. It's time.

 

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